The 10,000 Hour Principle

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In his book Outliers, author Malcolm Gladwell makes the statement that it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill. Is this in fact practical and how exactly does it work? Firstly I would suggest you read his book, here is what I have found and observed over my time working various leaders and business people.

Many may not agree with the 10,000 hour rule, but rather look at is as a principle than a rule. Mastering a skill is not easy and takes commitment and it is not just about putting in 10,000 hours whenever it suits you, thus gaining the hours over a period of ten years or even seven years would not be sufficient to master the skill. The principle is about practicing and using time effectively to master the skill. What do these 10,000 hours effectively look like?

If you spent 5 hours a day practicing your skill, it would take you 2,000 days or five and a half years. Yes you will probably be reasonably proficient at your skill and your skill may be able to make you a bit of money. The more you consistently practice the better you will get, as long as you are also moving with the current trends in your chosen skill.

Life is always about consistency, skip a day in that process and you only delay the result. With this information would you agree with the 10,000 hour rule or do you have an alternative suggestion? I would welcome your comments.

Photo credit: Robert Scott Photography / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND 

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About RichSimmondsZA

Father | Professional Speaker | Top 50 International & Forbes Top 10 African Social Influencer | RuleBreaker and ChangeMaker | Author 5 Night Plan & MugAndTweet Books
This entry was posted in Inspiration, LEADERSHIP and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The 10,000 Hour Principle

  1. Thabane Khwela says:

    Yes I would like to be enrolled in this communication,leadership,success(Leadership).

    Like

  2. It’s a valuable principle even though it’s seen as controversial. What I take from this, is what you are highlighting -consistency. Of course, there are other values that support this, such as clarity, passion and more.

    Like

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