Is the Leader a Diva? – An Authentic Test

Screen Shot 2015-05-25 at 6.16.39 AMHow can you tell if a leader is actually authentic? Simply stated, are they serving the people or serving themselves? If you need a little more clarity on the meaning of leadership I suggest reading What Leadership means …

So-called leaders who are caught up in pride have a need to be worshipped (yes, they are often religious leaders) and they demand certain protocols from the organisers of events. The reality is they are not leaders, they are just Divas.

How to spot a Diva Leader?

This is so common, the question should actually be reversed … Something like ‘How do I know when my leader is not a Diva?’ But let’s look at the typical ways to spot such a leader: 1) They dislike being called by their first name, they prefer to be addressed as Mr. or Mrs. 2) They like to do the talking and they will choose to answer only certain questions, or they will pass the lesser and random questions off for assistants to answer. 3) At functions they prefer to wait in holding rooms, rather than being with people. 4) They need their own chair at a function, they demand certain types of refreshments and expect to be served more than anyone else. 5) They expect that you treat their spouses and family as if they too were your leaders. 6) But the real sign of a Diva Leader is when someone more important than themselves arrives. e.g. the Company President or – a high-ranking church or government official. Then they adopt a puppy-like, subservient behaviour that makes you question why they were held in such high regard by yourself in the first place.

Why do they behave like this?

They are insecure and lack accountability – yes, the only reason why they act like this is to put distance between you and themselves – they hope you won’t question something they have done. They have the idea they are never wrong, and take offence if you challenge or question them. They will seldom take part in any team activities, and prefer to observe for fear of being judged as being less than they think they are.

How can we be a Leader who is not a Diva?

We should never allow our EGOS to get the better of us. Remember that the followers who follow us need us, and we need them. We should serve our followers, allow time in our schedules to listen to people and more importantly, realise that we can learn more about others and ourselves from random questions. Simply learn to listen.

Never allow organisers to force us into a holding room, the authentic message is simple to the followers: we must think we are better than them … Remember if the people cannot easily access us and they cannot see us, we cannot serve the people and we will be forgotten – in fact they will probably look for another leader. When this happens we simply become Divas.

We have a responsibility to never allow our pride to take us to places where we lose our relevance with people; it can happen so easily and our only purpose is always to make a difference in the lives of others. If we cannot be amongst people, we cannot make a difference and we will never serve people or become a leader.

Photo credit: fab’s_photos / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

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About RichSimmondsZA

Father | Professional Speaker | Top 50 International & Forbes Top 10 African Social Influencer | RuleBreaker and ChangeMaker | Author 5 Night Plan & MugAndTweet Books
This entry was posted in LEADERSHIP and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Is the Leader a Diva? – An Authentic Test

  1. Pingback: Fall Of Man | Music Smells Like Noise

  2. Pingback: Is the Leader a Diva? – An Authentic Test – thilognedierrysite

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